Essentials Brief: Telemedicine Study | HIMSS Analytics
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Essentials Briefs

HIMSS Analytics regularly publishes Essentials Briefs on a variety of healthcare technology areas and market segments. Vendors can purchase the Essentials Briefs using the links below. Providers can receive the Essentials Briefs for free by emailing us from a qualified email address.
Essentials Brief: Telemedicine Study
Published September 9, 2015

In addition to data from the HIMSS Analytics® Database and unique insight from healthcare IT executives across the country, this year's Study includes year-over-year comparisons with information from the 2014 U.S. Telemedicine Study.  Highlights include:

  • An uptick in adoption and increase in familiarity with telemedicine products and services (YOY)
  • 70% of respondents reported two-way video/webcam usage, making it the most utilized telemedicine product/solution
  • Detailed insight into respondents’ telemedicine/telehealth services five year outlook

MORE RESEARCH REPORTS

While Picture Archive Communications System or PACS adoption across healthcare is high, potential growth opportunities abound.

Building upon the critical insight provided in 2015, HIMSS Analytics releases the 2016 Telemedicine Study, an Essentials Brief that highlights three years’ worth of market data focused on the adoption of telemedicine technology across the U.S. hospital market.

Actionable insights:

  •  Access current telemedicine solution adoption rates and plans to purchase
  • Understand vendor market share and mind share
  • Get snapshot statistics for telemedicine solutions across the entire US hospital landscape

Access the 2016 Precision Medicine Essentials Brief, a study on the U.S. Precision Medicine solutions market. This study provides insight into precision medicine solution adoption and purchase intentions from healthcare delivery organizations in the U.S. market.

Over half of US hospitals reported use of smartphones and/or tablet computers at their facilities. 69% of respondents noted that they used apps to access clinical information; however, only 33% reportedly believe they can access most or all of the clinical systems technologies they need via smartphones/tablet computers.